Workshops

African languages teachers: 1 - 3 July 14:00 - 17:00

Theme: Indigenous languages in contemporary African society

We cordially invite teachers of African Languages (IsiZulu, Sepedi and Setswana) to a series of workshops as part of our annual national language conference. We have scheduled these slots specifically for teachers and two of the three sessions will be presented in Sepedi/SeTswana or isiZulu, specifically to honour UNESCO’s year of the indigenous languages. There is no charge for attending but the registration form below must be completed.

Should you participate in all three workshops, you will be issued with a certificate of attendance as proof of your using professional development opportunities.

Tea/coffee will be served.

Dr Lesedi Magano  lesedi.magano@up.ac.za | 079 820 6309

Dr Connie Makgabo connie.makgabo@up.ac.za | 072 923 8838

Mr Xolani Khohliso (PhD candidate) xolani.khohliso@up.ac.za | 083 408 8248

PROGRAMME

Monday, 1 July  14:00 - 17:00  Session 1 

  • Interpreting the curriculum when teaching African languages.
  • How does teaching oral literature fit into the contemporary society?

Tuesday, 2 July 14:00 - 17:00  Session 2

Read, Create, and Adapt Digital Storybooks

A workshop for Foundation Phase teachers

In this workshop you will get a taste of the African Storybook website with over 5000 openly licensed FREE storybooks in 179 of the languages spoken on the continent. You will work with other teachers on new and exciting ways to use and create storybooks with children, and also on how you can adapt storybooks from across the continent for South African children.

Please bring your own smartphone or tablet or laptop or bring one device to share with a friend.

Facilitators:

  • Dorcas Wepukhulu: teacher, children’s writer, and African Storybook Partner Development Coordinator based in Kenya
  • Tessa Welch: teacher educator and African Storybook Project Leader based in South Africa.

or

  • Online language learning and support (Please see separate tab for full detail)

Wednesday, 3 July  14:00 - 17:00  Session 3

  •  Teaching grammar in a communicative way.
  • Using technology to enhance the teaching of African languages

Please complete the registration form at the bottom of this web page by Friday 28 June 

Postgraduates & emerging researchers: Academic Writing for research and publication Monday 1 July 15:00 - 17:30

Theme: Indigenous languages in contemporary African society

Date: Monday, 1 July 2019 15:00 – 17:30

Topic(s): Academic Writing for research and publication, Academic discourse conventions, Crafting literature review, distilling findings into policy

Presenter(s): Dr Sindiso Zhou & Dr Nhlanhla Landa

Language of communication: English

Dr Sindiso Zhou is a Deputy Head of Department and Lecturer in the Department of English and Comparative Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities at the University of Fort Hare in South Africa. She is a trainer in academic writing, research and publication, as well as postgraduate mentorship. She does research in the fields of language contact, language pedagogy, multilingualism, translanguaging, the sociolinguistics-onomastics interface, academic research and writing, gender empowerment and justice as well as communication.

Dr Nhlanhla Landa is a Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Department of English at the University of Fort Hare. He is a professional editor and trainer in higher education research and writing for publication. His research interests comprise discourse analysis, language and the media, language pedagogy, communication, language and politics, language and religion as well as onomastics.

Contact email nlanda@ufh.ac.za

Please complete the registration form at the bottom of this web page by Friday 28 June

Researchers & supervisors: Language resources for the classroom Tuesday 2 July 14:00 - 17:00

Theme: Indigenous languages in contemporary African society
Date: Tuesday 2 July 2019 14:00 – 17:00

Workshop: Language resources for the classroom

As language educators we need to understand how our learners/students are changing and the ways technology can be used to aid their teaching and learning strategies. The movement towards multimodal language learning, from contact teaching to autonomous as well as blended and fully online modes, requires different skill sets such as e-moderation and new ways of designing and developing language learning tasks in the digital age.

With this workshop we will engage with participants in an interactive manner to empower them to eventually contribute to the larger language user community (teachers, learners, lecturers and students, general public/newspapers). Our presenters include local as well as international scholars who have solid track records of working in the field of language learning and multimodal approaches in teaching and learning. We have three broad topics that will be addressed by sharing best practices and involving participants.

Topic 1: Added value of online language learning and support - digital tool development for the language classroom

  • Introduction to syllabus and course design in a multimodal language learning environment (Prof. Kris van de Poel)
  • A digital showcase:
  • Skryfhulp - Writing support; the development of an online writing support tool (Ms Suléne Pilon, Mr DJ Cloete)
    • Write-it - Multi-modal academic writing assistance (Mr Zander Janse van Rensburg, Mr DJ Cloete)
    • Wired​ - Writing, Information Literacy and Reading Development (Dr Kristien Andrianatos, Prof. Tobie van Dyk)
  • Interactive session: round table discussion
    • Beauty and the beast: What happens behind the scenes?
    • FAQs: Costs, Timelines, Human Resources, Software

Topic 2: Best practices

  • Moving from general to specific (Prof. Kris van de Poel, Prof. Lieve de Wachter)
  • Interculturate (a platform for developing language for specific purposes) – Summarising as component of transactional writing (Prof. Kris van de Poel)
  • Taalvast (a platform for academic language learning)​ – Developing presentation skills (Prof. Lieve de Wachter)

Topic 3: Assessment

  • Test purpose: achievement, progress, placement, diagnostics (Prof. Tobie van Dyk)
  • Showcase:
    • Diagnostic language testing (Prof. Albert Weideman, Ms Anneke Butler)
    • Fair and unbiased language testing (Prof. Tobie van Dyk)
    • From generic to specific (Prof. Kris van de Poel)
  • Is online really that different from paper-based? (Prof. Albert Weideman)
  • Interactive session: round table discussion
    • Beauty and the beast: What happens behind the scenes?
    • FAQs: Costs, Timelines, Human Resources, Software

 A maximum of 30 participants can be accommodated in this ​free of charge​ workshop, funded by SADiLaR.  

Register at:

https://bit.ly/2K9kNjt​ for the ​Pretoria​ Workshop (2 July 2019)

https://bit.ly/2JIoIV6​  for the ​Potchefstroom​ Workshop (4 July 2019)

https://bit.ly/2MeT4At​ for the  ​Bloemfontein​ Workshop (5 July 2019)

https://bit.ly/2I4ws02​ for the ​Stellenbosch​ Workshop (8 July 2019)

Visit SADiLaR at: ​www.sadilar.org Visit ICELDA at: ​www.icelda.com 

Please complete the registration format the bottom of this web page by Friday 28 June

Researchers & supervisors: “It needs only a ‘light’ edit”: Negotiating the differences between light, medium and heavy text editing in an academic context Wednesday 3 July 14:00 - 17:00

Theme: Indigenous languages in contemporary African society

Date: Wednesday 3 July 2019 14:00 – 17:00

Topic: “It needs only a ‘light’ edit”: Negotiating the differences between light, medium and heavy text editing in an academic context

Presenter: John Linnegar University of Antwerp, Belgium

John Linnegar has been practising as a text editor since the early 1980s, when he cut his teeth as a copy-editor of legal and academic textbooks. An Accredited Professional Editor and Life Member of the Professional Editors’ Guild in South Africa as well as an active member of several other societies of professional editors, he has since specialised in providing editing services for academic publications for clients worldwide. Through his business, editandtrain, he has also become the leading trainer of copy-editors and proofreaders in South Africa. He has written and co-authored several publications, including Text Editing: A handbook for students and practitioners (UPA, 2012), Engleish, our Engleish: Common problems in South African English and how to resolve them (Pharos, 2013) and, more recently, Grammar, punctuation and all that jazz … (MLA Publications, 2019). He is currently engaged in research towards a PhD (on a subject related to text editors, of course!) at Antwerp University, Belgium; during his time there he has also taught editing skills to English Master’s students and academic writing skills to a wide range of doctoral researchers.

In 2010, John began researching the question of how to distinguish between the three levels of editing (light, medium and heavy), only to find that very few authors had written about it. It is their ideas – plus a model for text analysis and improvement and his own guide to how to quantify the levels in specific editing tasks – that he will be sharing and workshopping, using a set of real texts.

Topic: “It needs only a ‘light’ edit”: Negotiating the differences between light, medium and heavy text editing in an academic context

In this three-hour workshop, first the different levels of editing or revision – light, medium and heavy/extreme, as labelled and described by leading authors on the subject – will be explained. Then, by examining the extent of the errors that need correcting in several sample texts, participants will gain a more informed, hands-on idea of how to distinguish between the different levels of editing or revision and, as a result, begin to do so systematically and with greater confidence. John will also share a model for text analysis and improvement and his technique for quantifying the level of editing involved, one that takes into account the nature and number of the corrections to be performed on a text.

Although the session will be English-language based, the guidance from the editing gurus he will be sharing applies to all languages, writers and writing.

From this workshop, academic supervisors, postgraduate writers (who also need to be self-editors) and text editors will take away a set of criteria and tools that will help them to distinguish the different levels. These will be especially useful when individuals have to justify the extent of editing or revising required – and, importantly, the related fee and the deadline for completion.

What prominent authors on the subject have to say ...

Writers with a reputation for submitting well-prepared texts, or who are likely to be hostile or hypersensitive to major changes, will often request only a light edit (whatever that means), and the text editor’s bill will be expected to reflect this. Medium editing is naturally the norm to which most texts penned by reasonably competent writers conform (Merriam-Webster 2001: 235), and usually entails two passes through a text (Einsohn 2000: 16; Mackenzie 2011: 168). Heavy editing conveys broad latitude to shape a text’s language and content components (and a little structural editing) (Davies & Balkwill 2011: 170; Einsohn 2005: 12; Mackenzie 2011: 169). It is used if a work is in need of significant improvement, usually in the opinion of either the supervisor, the writer or the text editor (Davies & Balkwill 2011: 170). When this decision is taken, the next question that arises is this: Will the (student-)writer be capable of making the text (eg thesis or article) accceptable to its target audience or should a detached professional text editor be asked to undertake the necessary improvements instead?

Please complete the registration form at the bottom of this web page by Friday 28 June

Workshop registration form

Please complete the form by Friday 28 June

Please select the workshop(s) you would like to attend